Castle Tapestry
Castle Tapestry Home ORDER LINE - 209-846-9759 - Email: castletapestry@gmail.com

How to Hang Your Tapestry

There are several methods used in hanging a tapestry.
The decision as to which one to use, of course, depends on your decor.
The costs of these different hanging methods can vary considerably -
from almost nothing to hundreds of dollars!
We will be happy to assist you in any way we can.

HOW TO HANG YOUR TAPESTRY
  • UNFINISHED TAPESTRIES
  • CUSTOM TAPESTRIES
  • METAL RODS AND FINIALS
  • PLACEMENT ON YOUR WALL
  • MEASURING FOR HOOKS OR BRACKETS
  • TAPESTRY HOOKS
  • RINGS/BARS
  • BASEBOARD (ROD POCKET ONLY)
  • VELCRO
  • CURVED WALLS
  • LOOPS/TABS
  • TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
  • SAFETY
  • SOLID BRASS
    TAPESTRY HOOKS

    Wine Tapestry

    CUSTOM TAPESTRIES
    UNFINISHED TAPESTRIES WITHOUT ROD POCKET OR LOOPS
    There is a good possibility that the tapestry you want to hang is unfinished. Unfinished in the sense that at the present time it does not have a lining, a rod pocket, loops, or border.
    If this is the case, you are free to have it made ready to hang in any way you see below. If you need any sewing done, you should be able to find a local source.

    CUSTOM TAPESTRIES
    Basically all of our Custom Handwoven Tapestries will have a rod pocket for hanging. Tapestries that are overly wide will usually have a "button hole" slit in the center for central support. It is possible to have only a rod pocket attached to the top and to leave the back open for inspection of the hand work.

    METAL & WOOD RODS & FINIALS
    There are also some magnificent rods available, both metal and wood, as well as a wide assortment of finials. Many of these rods are adjustable, and come with matching brackets and some are adjustable. They are also available in several finishes You can find these rods at most home improvement stores as well as many major departments stores.

    PLACEMENT OF THE TAPESTRY ON YOUR WALL
    Now that you know what you will need to hang your tapestry, the next thing you will need to look at is where it is going to be hung. Not just the room but the placement of it IN the room. In most cases the placement is obvious as it is dictated by the available space. However, there are now homes with increasingly higher walls that make the placement decision a little harder. There really is not an absolutely right answer as to how high or how low one should hang a tapestry, as it has mostly to do with the proportions you are working with and in the end, be pleasing to the eye. If you are having some difficulty with the placement of your tapestry, you might want to make a mock up of its size with newspaper or butcher paper and look at it in various spots on your wall.

    MEASURING FOR THE PLACEMENT OF HOOKS OR BRACKETS
    Obviously the width of the tapestry is going to determine where you place hooks or brackets. Ideally they should be placed within 3" of either side of the tapestry. The size of the rod, finials and hooks or brackets all need to be taken into consideration before deciding where you are going to put your first screw or wall anchor.

    HOOKS/BRACKETS

    Once you have the rod through the pocket or the loops, you need to have a system in place that will support the rod and the tapestry. To this end you can use hooks, brackets or the hardware that come with a rod/finial package. Hooks and brackets come in brass, wood, wrought iron, etc. Most commercial rods (such as a telegraphing cafe rod) come packaged with hooks that will hold the tapestry out from the wall. Some people prefer this but the tapestry normally looks better as close to the wall as possible. There are some brass hooks that will accomplish this. These hooks can be used with either brass or wood rods. If you want to have your own design in wrought iron, you may be able to find an ironworks near you that will do custom rods, hooks and brackets.

    RINGS & BARS
    There are a number of tapestries that the hanging system consists of a series of rings or bars that are sown on the lining at the top of the tapestry. This calls for a number of things: 1) measuring the distance between the rings/bars; 2)drawing a straight line (using a level) on the wall; 3) marking the same distances on the wall as on the tapestry; 4)putting screws, nails or cup hooks at each of the marks; 5)then hanging the tapestry. This does get the tapestry very close to the wall and has a very nice, finished look.

    BASEBOARD (ROD POCKET ONLY)
    There is another very effective (and inexpensive ) way of hanging a tapestry with a rod pocket. This is done by simply using a piece of baseboard a little shorter than the length of the tapestry. The width of the baseboard can vary with the width of the pocket on the tapestry. Once you have the baseboard cut to length, drill a hole at each end that is equidistant and centered. Determine where you will be hanging the tapestry, then, using a level and pencil, mark through the drilled holes where the screws will be placed. Now that the screw holes are determined you will probably want to put "wall anchors" where the screws will be going. Then, put the baseboard into the pocket and secure one end of the baseboard at a time using screws the right size for the wall anchor. As you can tell, this puts the tapestry right next to the wall, the top being very straight and level. The cost of this installation is usually just a few dollars.

    VELCRO
    The last way suggested to hang a tapestry is with velcro. This will usually require some amount of sewing (there is some self adhesive velcro available). Velcro is available in a variety of widths from 1/2" to 4". The width you use depends on the weight and width of the tapestry Half of the velcro needs to be added to the top of the lining. The other half of the lining can be put on (stapling is the best) a piece of baseboard (rather than attaching the velcro directly to the wall). Again, pre-drill the baseboard as mentioned above, and put wall anchors in to place before securing baseboard. Make sure you use a level. Then simply attach the tapestry to the velcro strip on the wall. The cost of the velcro application is somewhat more than just using a baseboard. In addition to the cost of the velcro, there is the cost of the baseboard and perhaps the cost of the labor to sew on the velcro.

    CURVED WALLS
    Another good use of velcro is on a curved wall. This is especially good for some over-the-fireplace and stairwell applications. To use the velcro in this way requires a flexible or "bender" board. You would prepare the tapestry and the board the same as on a flat wall.

    A WORD ABOUT LOOPS/TABS
    As you have seen above, a rod is necessary for hanging a tapestry finished with loops/tabs. A lot of people prefer this method but it has it's drawbacks. The caution having a tapestry finished with this hanging method is that, unless the tapestry is sewn exactly right (our specialty!) the tapestry, after hanging for some period of time
    tends to "cup" - curve inward - between the loops.

    TOOLS/EQUIPMENT
    When using hooks or brackets, rings or bars, velcro or baseboard, good measurement is essential. In all of the installations it is also necessary to be armed with the proper equipment. Here is a list of some of the epuipment/tools you may find useful:

    -Ladder Especially for higher installations. It is recommended that you take precautions to keep from marring the wall with the ladder. An old towel works pretty good for this.

    -Tape Measure A yardstick/straight edge may also be helpful. Make sure you have one long enough to measure all of your distances - from the top of your ceiling down and for any side to side measurement

    -Pencil Good and sharp to make the least amount of marks

    -Level For a nice, finished, even look, a level is essential

    -Screwdriver/Powerdriver . Select the right type for the type screws you have

    -Wall Anchors Most installations will be into dry wall. Select the right size.

    -Hammer/Rubber Mallet . Just in case! Actually a rubber mallet can come in handing when inserting the wall anchors. Putting something over the rubber mallet, such as a sock, can keep from marring the wall.

    SAFETY
    Due to the fact that most tapestry installations require ladders and possibly some power equipment, please remember to use CAUTION. Remember, most accidents occur in the home!


    PLEASE LET US KNOW IF THIS PAGE HAS BEEN HELPFUL TO YOU
    EMAIL US AT
    castletapestry@gmail.com

    For more information about this topic, contact Ron Whaley at castletapestry@gmail.com













    eXTReMe Tracker